Local Artists

Here are the incredible local Artists from last year!! The ‘2014 local Artists will be unveiled soon!!

2013 Wild & Scenic Film Festival Art Exhibition: A Climate of Change

Broda-Greta

Greta Broda

Greta Broda, at Abstract
Mountains, rivers, flowers, sun and shadow attract my eye. I never tire of the natural beauty of the Sierra Foothills. Landscape painting gives me an excuse to dwell for hours, days, even weeks, on a bend in the river or reflections on a lake. Attempting to paint these places may also be an attempt to honor the spirits that abide deep in granite, that sparkle briefly on water. It is a privilege to live in such a beautiful and peaceful place. Paints and brushes help me to be mindful and observant.

Brook, LeeAnn HirschmansGlow

LeeAnn Brook

LeeAnn Brook, at The Fix Restaurant and New Moon Cafe
As a contemporary landscape painter, I consider myself a “studio activist”. The goal of my art is to create awareness for the beauty of our natural environment that is ever-changing. I focus on landscapes that are intended to give you a feeling or memory of actually being in that particular environment, as a way to encourage preservation of what is fragile. Through an expressive layering of colors, textures and awareness of light, my paintings are about atmospheres of water, grasslands and forests that evoke our senses and command our attention for protection.

Phil Brown

Phil Brown

Phil Brown, at Mowen Solinsky
In the tradition of the Hudson River School, I attempt to capture moments and places along the branches of the Yuba River and its watershed in the Sierra Nevada Mountains with the purpose of recording them and increasing their public importance as areas to respect —and save.

 

Cameron, Sheila

Sheila Cameron

Sheila Cameron, at Harmony Books
I am an Artist, Writer, Wife and Mother. In the past I have been a film and TV producer, web personality, t-shirt snark artist and pop culture commentator. I created the “FREE KATIE” t-shirt and meme and am also known as “kit” who ran the Project Greenlight web community and Co-Produced the first season of the Emmy Nominated Project Greenlight TV show. I am passionate about technology as a way to connect to our humanity. My work as an emerging artist is only possible because of personal connections on the internet. Artists play an important role in our evolution as technology takes hold of our daily lives. I believe it is our responsibility to be highly engaged with society as it shifts to protect the arts, environment, and human compassion. My art explores the tension between the natural world and the civilized world especially as it relates to being being a woman and mother. The forces and expectations of both create questions, anxiety and pockets of joy and peace that I attempt to capture through my art and writing. I am part of the Art Works Gallery in Grass Valley California.

Geolyn Carvin

Geolyn Carvin

Geolyn Carvin, at Grey Goose
A native of California, Geolyn enjoys all the natural advantages of living in such a vast and varied state.  As a child she camped every summer in Yosemite, hiked the mountains and played in the surf of the Pacific Ocean. January 1st of 2002 Geolyn put her mind to hiking the Pacific Crest Trail.  With her busy schedule completing it in sections seemed the wise thing to do.  As she hikes she writes a journal documenting her many adventures.  Passing these “short stories” around for all to read, it became apparent that it was comedy. This is how “Boots” McFarland was born.  Why not draw some of these ridiculous situations. Every hiker experiences them and better to laugh at than cry. Geolyn is also a musician/songwriter and has performed with many bands across the country.  She is currently working on her third solo album.

Sarah Coleman

Sarah Coleman

Sarah Coleman, at Kitkitdizze
My process involves layers of physical matter and a loose practice of alchemy. To begin, I cover wood with metal sheets. The warmth and history of the wood remains concealed by the luminous metal leaf. After repeated layering of translucent oil glazes and varnish, the metal shines and glimmers through to the surface. Ultimately the refraction of light through wood, metal and oil results in a shifting, internally glowing Sky-Scape. Viewers may perceive movement and see their own reflections cast against clouds that appear to roll amid occasional lightening strikes. The shifting sky-scape illustrates the illusiveness and transience of weather, mood and metaphorically, the nature of human relationships.

This mixture of scientifically explainable atmospheric phenomena, combined with elements of my own imagination, co-exists on the same plane to create fresh perspectives and ask new questions about the nature of experience, reality and perception. I use the Sky-Scape as a stage to explore notions of credibility, emphasizing the space between the real and the unreal. My paintings are intended to gift the viewer with a point of departure for daydreaming, exploration and reflection.

Liz Collins

Liz Collins

Liz Collins, at Szabo Wine Tasting Room
Working with oil pastels for the past 20 years, the move into mixed media has sparked an exciting, new creative path. The work is a spirited exploration of planes, transparency and the use of maps, sheet music and writing as both texture and metaphor. Using the line of selected planes breaks the solidity of the surface and gives the piece a life of its own. In addition, the use of my own writing and poetry has opened up yet another exciting path for me, putting into living color images that had lived inside me when I wrote the piece. With oil pastels and acrylics as my “background” media I mostly work on panel that has been gessoed, then finally, coated with an archival varnish.

Jennifer Rain Crosby

Jennifer Rain Crosby

Jennifer Rain Crosby, at New Moon Cafe
My family moved to Nevada County from Nebraska in 1975.  I was 5 years old and from the very first moment, I was enchanted with the landscape.  The maze of hills, canyons and endless winding dirt roads.  The massive trees, woven mysteriously together into a forest cathedral.  The wondrous river, where I could swim with my eyes open, try to catch darting fish with my hands and rock hop like a mountain goat across granite boulders.  And the placer diggins, a magic portal to the moon. 37 years later I am still enchanted by this land.  In plein aire oil painting I discovered a way to create portals to all the places that inspire me.  Plein aire means “in the open air” and I paint exclusively on site enabling me to catch a moment in time like a butterfly in a net.  The fleeting light, location and season, my brush, paint and canvas, my perception, intuition and imagination combine in each work of art.

Gene Crowe

Gene Crowe

Gene Crowe, at the Alpha Building Festival HQ
For several years, abandoned mines in the Nevada desert have been a source of interesting images. Gradually, the desert is reclaiming itself with wind and sand grinding everything, and skies sometimes white with dust, other times dark and cloudless . On each visit, I have found the mine and its structures changed, and that signs of human activity continue to aid the process.

 

Kenna Elizabeth

Kenna Elizabeth

Kenna Elizabeth, at Matteos Public
Though interested in art and photography since youth, I entered “career-world” in a corporate office, wielding a Communications degree from Pepperdine University.  However, my relationship with cubicle-life was not an amicable one.   A greater sense of purpose, and the beauty of Nature, beckoned me… relentlessly. Modifying the use of my degree, I embarked upon a career in outdoor education.  Teaching as a Naturalist allowed me to immerse myself in nature… AND showed me the vast behavioral changes that accompany inspiration.  Sharing the wonder of nature, while teaching preservation, proved to be a powerful motivator. Someone who truly LOVES the outdoors makes a much better steward than someone who just hears what he or she “should” do. Encouraged by the enthusiasm of newly inspired students, I embarked on a mission to share nature’s beauty with others… to “take it” to those who may not otherwise experience it. Another avenue of sharing and teaching revealed itself…  I embraced the visual element of communication, and photography has proven to be a powerful aid in encouraging appreciation of Nature. It is my sincere hope that something in my work speaks to You, and that we ALL become “inspired students” together… caring for our world better, not because we “should,” but because we want to.

Chula Gemignani

Chula Gemignani

Chula Gemignani, at Miners Foundry/Lobby and the Haven Underground
ART BACKGROUND Chula (Linda) Gemignani received a Bachelors of Arts degree in Metalsmithing and Fine Art from San Francisco State University in 1991. Her medium of choice is currently woodcut and painting. in her early career as a metal artist, her work was exhibited throughout California.
ART AND ACTIVISM Upon a visit to Oaxaca, Mexico, Chula created the piece “Viva La Milpa”. An image that she campaigned there, postering city walls, and making educational information on the risks of GMO contamination using the image to turn the informational sheet into a gift of art. It was there in Oaxaca that she experienced first hand the power of activism through the medium of art. Standing in plazas handing out the art/info she felt the support and enthusiasm of the Oaxaca residents to protect the heart of their culture, the native corn of Mexico. This one piece of art brought awareness and empowerment to thousands of people! Chula is now an art activist, committed preserving and protecting the heirloom corn varieties of Mexico and inspiring artists to direct art pieces towards positive change. Her Project Viva La Milpa has become a traveling art exhibit currently 30 pieces. This exhibit travels from City to city throughout Mexico and Chula works on local issues back in her town of Nevada City supporting environmental change whenever she can.

Leslie Guinan and Rob Matthews

Leslie Guinan and Rob Matthews

Rob Matthews and Leslie Guinan, at JJ Jacksons
Rob was a stained glass artist for 30 years. He has created gallery pieces and commissions throughout the country and worked with prominent architects and designers such as Clodagh. Leslie is formally trained as a furniture maker. She began woodworking as a creative outlet while working as an environmental lawyer, and spent a year at the College of the Redwoods Fine Woodworking Program. Their collaborative partnership began with furniture and has evolved to include work for the wall and sculpture. Light-weight concrete is the core material in all their work. It is combined with various other materials including hand-cut glass, found objects, wood, metal, paper, plant materials and photographs. They create a unique mold for each piece. Texture is created in the mold. If the piece will contain glass, the glass design is created and adhered to the mold. The piece is then cast with lightweight concrete. Recycled Styrofoam aggregate is used to reduce weight, locking it inside a piece of art and keeping it out of the landfill. Color is added after the piece has cured. Once cured, the piece is painted with various concrete stains and pigments, or encaustic. Themes are frequently architectural, exploring our relationship to the built environment and the feelings of belonging or alienation which can arise from perceptions of place. Rob and Leslie each do all steps of the process, with the division of labor varying on each piece according to the muse. They do not employ assistants.

Ed Hensley

Ed Hensley

Ed Hensley, at Alpha Building Festival HQ
Beauty is the often-cited reason for saving wild and scenic land. Beauty is also most often a product of culture and convention rather than individual vision. Seeing beauty is not just looking at Grand Canyons and Yosemites. It’s not looking at all. Seeing beauty requires seeing beautifully. Seeing beauty in the unexpected is like yoga for the muscles that see beauty. I try to find and show the unexpected and unseen beauty that could be lurking right at our feet.

Devin Hiemstra

Devin Hiemstra

Devin Hiemstra, at Miners Foundry/NC Box Office
Changing Climate: Glaciers have long been the poster-child of climate change. I have always been drawn to their massive size and the impressiveness of their ever-changing state of grace. When I finally had the chance to see glaciers in person I was even more impressed. I am constantly in awe and now, more than ever, feel like glaciers are as much alive as trees and people. This collection of images tries to capture the beauty of these beasts while serving as a reminder that climate change is real and Glaciers all over the world are shrinking at unprecedented rates.

Trina Hunner

Trina Hunner

Trina Hunner, at Grass Valley Wine Co.
The painting Cracked Shell pays homage to the shellfish and it’s unfortunate battle against the increased acidity in its environment. As we continue to emit carbon dioxide into our atmosphere our oceans absorb it and become more acidic.  This more acidic (or less alkaline) environment has several consequences on marine life. High acid levels make it very difficult for shellfish to make shells thick enough to survive.   Cracked Shell is painted on a cracked medium to portray the weakened state of the shellfish and the vulnerable position climate change has imposed on this delicate creature. The paintings Bye Bye Birch I and Bye Bye Birch II ponder the question “Will our forest survive in a warming planet?” As global temperatures increase the survival of many tree species is increasingly uncertain. A fragmented background and a merging of foreground and background were used in both paintings in the series to depict the uncertainty of the birch tree’s place in the new world being created by climate change.

Ken Hunt

Ken Hunt

Ken Hunt, at Voici
Statement: Seeker. Aspiring vagabond. Survivor. Taker of photographs.

 

 

Gail Lipson

Gail Lipson

Gail Lipson, at Alpha Building Festival Headquarters
I have always loved photographs that capture the mood of the moment.  That is my goal in photography – to share with the viewer how I see and experience the natural world.  We live in a time and place where some of these glorious scenes of nature are disappearing. I want to share the experience of the sun reflecting off clear water, newly fallen untouched snow, birds foraging unmolested, sunsets viewed in a clear sky, peaceful moments by the river. These are scenes I find inspiring and I hope that those who view my photographs feel the same.  If my photographs help remind people of some of their own experiences enjoying nature and how threatened it all is, then I have done my job. gail@photosofoldamerica.com

Thad Little

Thad Little

Thad Little, at The Earth Store
I am a stained glass artist specializing in custom designed stained glass windows that incorporate many natural design elements.  The window represents the four elements (Earth, wind, fire, water) and the circle of life.  The elements transition through the primary, secondary and tertiary colors and wrap around a golden rectangle with a fused glass image of man (life).  A fused glass panel in the bottom portion represents conception/birth with a stylized image within the fire element.  When designing and creating this window, I wanted to make people think about the fundamentals of life on Earth that seem to be waning in value as mankind grows evermore self-centered and disconnected.  The images in this window represent the rudimentary agents of change: both human and environmental.

Jeff Litton

Jeff Litton

Jeff Litton, at Matteos Public
Jeff Litton is a local artist and international wildlife defender. He works as an undersea specialist on the National Geographic expedition ships, as well as international conservation projects with organizations like Sea Shepherd conservancy. Addicted to close encounters with wildlife, Jeff goes to great lengths to meet with and protect evolution’s wonders. He has also worked with iLCP, the International League of Conservation Photographers. His shark campaign brought the voice of Galapagos’s Governor to Governor Jerry Brown before he passed AB-376 for shark conservation. Nearly a quarter million people have seen his work on Google earth and YouTube, as well as Japanese national television. With camera in hand, Jeff sets out to inspire people to care about the planet.

Judith Lowry

Judith Lowry

Judith Lowry at the Powell House
Known for her narrative paintings, sees her work as influenced by both the traditional storytelling of Northern California Indian culture and by modern news stories.  She draws inspiration from ancient Maidu, Pitt River, and Washu stories that tell of destructive weather phenomenon that are considered to be an expression of the Creator’s displeasure at the peoples neglect of earthly stewardship. She feels this parallels the present day beliefs held by many that it is human activity causing some of the extreme geological and climate conditions today.The roundhouse, Kum, a central image depicted in these paintings, is symbolic of the earth, our environment and our home. It is raised up and engulfed by the powerful winds of a tornado or engulfed by fire. This vision represents the destructive power of nature unleashed by the imbalances of human activity in the environment. Created by Lowry just prior to fire season in her home region of the Sierra Nevada, and during tornado season witnessed in TV news, the paintings exude an anxious energy that brings a personal immediacy to the issue of drought and climate change.Through the vivid and colorful images of a tornado and fire, Judith asks us to consider the truth present in these natural forces.

Jill Mahanna, at New Moon Cafe

Jill Mahanna

Jill Mahanna

“Surrounded by the foothills of the Sierras and the Yuba River, I was moved, actually driven, to paint what I saw. The sensuality of the natural world is my inspiration. For me, the challenge is to make a painting that resonates with a similar intensity.”

Now, many years and two children later, she continues to be captivated and motivated by the landscape around her. Jill exhibits her paintings primarily in Northern California and Nevada. Her work may be found in private collections across the U.S. and Canada.

Tatiana Makovkin

Tatiana Makovkin

Tatiana Makovkin and RAFTT (Radical Art For These Times), at Alpha Building Festival Headquarters
RAFTT is a collaborative group of activist artists.  Welcoming and inclusive, we work with an array of media and subject matter.  Group structure is loose and inspiration-based.  Our holistic approach weaves minds, hearts, hands, and the energy of the street, and we are community and friends as well as co-creators.  Radical is defined as “relating to, or proceeding from a root,” and as radical artists we aim to go deep, to the root of the matter. The piece on display in the Alpha Building, called “When They Felt the Call to Defend the Earth…”, was originally shown on Earth Day 2012.  About a dozen activists participated in the fun of creating it.  We propose that beautiful art, harmonious design, surprising combinations, and humorous overtones can disarm folks who have become fossilized or confused, perhaps even opening their minds and their hearts to receive the brave truth.

Dylan McConnell

Dylan McConnell

Dylan McConnell, at Miners Foundry/NC Box Office
Philadelphian artist Dylan Sherwood McConnell obtained a BFA in Painting from Rhode Island School of Design in 1993, and has since stitched a story arc between east/west coasts as a working artist, creative director, and composer. His recent relocation to Nevada City in September 2010 has precipitated a bold shift in content and materials culled from the area and produced a prolific body of new work inspired by its unique geographic space. Always process driven, these new pieces seek to address the bond of temporality and to establish an analog between interior/exterior spaces.

Gary R. Miller

Gary R. Miller

Gary R. Miller, at Grey Goose
My art is a visual reaction to the physical world by the use of “non-art” materials. These materials excite my imagination and allow me to manipulate forms in fresh ways. Some of these non-art materials over the years have been credit cards, oven-grills, and more recently road maps. My process of making Art follows a pattern of curiosity. It is as if I see images in my head, but I have to materialize them in order to understand their context. This process requires lots of drawing, until I find the context to develop the ideas more closely to my mind’s eye. These non-art materials take on a new format, kind of like backgrounds, or metaphorical supports, which support my forms in unexpected ways, and allow me to reflect on life’s ambiguities and my sense of humor.  In any case, I enjoy making my art and I hope you will find it engaging.  My current art work is expressionistic and idea oriented, but I am driven by those quirky ideas that bring forth a humorous reaction, such as laughter, or a smile. Primarily, I use a mixed media approach, using found objects, recycled expired credit cards, oven grilles, and old road maps as a foil to engrave, paint, collage and sculpt on.

Neighborhood Center for the Arts

Neighborhood Center for the Arts

Neighborhood Center for the Arts, at Broad Street Bistro
I like making money from my artwork because I get paid for doing the stuff I do. I like working in computer class, and my painting class where I paint and sometimes use oil pastels. I like to draw animals and happy faces. I am inspired by Star Wars movies and nature. I like to ride the bus to NCA, working in the garden is my favorite thing too. I like to plant flowers and turn the compost. I am happy when I come to work because I get to see my friends and all our staff. I have worked in other day programs and I think NCA is the best. When I am painting or drawing I feel good about myself because I am happy to be at work and like everybody that is around me. The garden is exciting because we can go outside and work in the sun. I like coming to NCA five days a week and feel lucky to be here. I also really like living in my group home and like my staff there too. This is our job and we get to make artwork. Art makes us feel good and I like that feeling. I have made money from my art and when I earn money I like to spend it on clothes and shoes. I say come by and see us when you can! We are great artists!

Terra Nyssa

Terra Nyssa

Terra Nyssa, at Mowen Solinsky & Fest HQ
Bit by bit I am making my way with the human conundrum.  My work is about the creative expression through the language of imagery.  Exploring this language by acknowledging relationship with self, and connection with all of which this Earth home provides.  Influenced by the sand I walked in all day through the desert canyons, or a shift in my perception of something that gave me cause to stop and wonder, I am emotionally awakened.  In the process of this movement there are moments of acceleration in which the work becomes an active force, as if it creates its self.  As if I am only a physical conduit allowing the voices of beings to tell their stories.  My wish is to provide a space to allow the viewer to celebrate the joys of life as well as ponder the human connection to that which is all around us.

John O'Neil

John O’Neil

John O’Neil, at The Earth Store
“Interactive Portraits of Life” – I use my experience and process as a painter to create interactive pictures of situations; how things come to be, rather than how they appear on the outside. My works are the result of plumbing a situation to its depth, and distilling it to a metaphor, comprised of symbolic pieces and engaging interactivity. They are designed to invite the spectator/user into the aspect of life of which they are a portrait, and provide a richer experience than observation alone.

Sally Peterson

Sally Peterson

Sally Peterson, at Miners Foundry & Haalo
From salvage yards and garage sales come the dreamscapes for the creations of unique and personal sculptures, home furnishings and design. Inspired in part by the discards of our world, and also by the bounties of nature and beauty of my home at Big Star Ranch, turning junk into treasures is my passion. From my home to yours…enjoy!

 

Pehrson Tahiti

Tahiti Pehrson

Tahiti Pehrson at Kitkitdizze
Tahiti Pehrson is a Northern Californian artist with long ties to the Bay Area. Recent works explores the fragility and interconnectedness expressed by physical structures. Large scale installations of geometrical hand cut paper are layered into three-dimensional structures. Pehrson has been working in paper for nearly fifteen years.

 

 

Susan Lobb Porter

Susan Lobb Porter

Susan Lobb-Porter, at Grass Valley Wine Co.
The first thing I do when confronted with a blank canvas it to crank up the music, jump right in and make some marks. At this early stage I’m not thinking about the finished painting, all I want to do is loosen up and cover up. I use all sorts of things for the early layers, pens, pencils, crayons, paint as I scribble along with the energy of the music. Sometimes I write words, write about my day or my life or the lyrics to the song that’s playing. And then I cover it up with more layers of paint. And scribbles. Sometimes collage. Layers and layers until the painting tells me what it wants to be. Where it wants to go. Sometimes that doesn’t happen right away. Sometimes I have to put it aside and come back to it. It’s important that I listen to the painting. That I let it guide me. Because when I do, when I paint intuitively, I’m not listening to my ego. Not listening to the voices of long ago teachers and critics. It’s just me. And the painting. And the music. Dancing and evolving. Together.

Louise Preston

Louise Preston

Louise Preston, at Nevada City Chamber of Commerce
Louise Preston’s paintings and prints are an outburst from the subconscious in response to our changing natural planet. In exploring color and movement, emotional landscapes emerge, expressing both her passionate love for the earth as well as perhaps “channeling” the earth’s own passion through art. Her sensibility is embodied in the process she uses, and the process is embodied in the painting itself. In other words, her goal is to break down or ignore any boundaries between herself, her vision, and the mechanisms of painting. Her body of work speaks boldly in its own language of her experiences, and her perceptions.

Kate Rannells

Kate Rannells

Kate Rannells, at Miners Foundry Lobby
I am a sculptor who lives and makes art in Oakland. I am fascinated with the macrocosmic and the microcosmic, from the pattern of exploding stars to the vast maps of information inside our own heads. Using paint, wax, and found objects, both manmade & natural, I try to echo the patterns I see all around me, hoping to inspire a sense of wonder in others. www.katerannells.com

Kerstin Ronsiek

Kerstin Ronsiek

Kerstin Ronsiek, at New Moon Cafe
I let my paintings evolve on the canvas, allowing for a visual poetry to emerge. The seamless transition of a thought or moment into the next fascinates me. By allowing boundaries of items to merge on the canvas, I want to question the survivability of one without the other. I attempt to create a non-exact world where imagination can merge with reality and connect us to unlikely possibilities, feelings and mysteries.

Eli Rush

Eli Rush

Eli Rush, at Alpha Building Festival Headquarters
The world is a beautiful place. Slowing down to observe its gifts reveal more of its treasures and secrets. The camera’s lens makes this even easier. The gift within the gift is that the more one looks, the more one sees, and, hopefully, the more one wants to look. I have come to find that as the years have passed, my relationship with, and my reverence for, the natural world has deepened. The light which falls upon it, nourishing. If asked to choose one word that would sum up all my reasons to photograph, that word would be gratitude.

Jade Sevelow

Jade Sevelow

Jade Sevelow, at Cafe Mekka
Adventurer, photographer, collector of stories. As a semi-professional nomad, I have spent the last 10 years traveling from one place to the next and as a young, 28yr old woman, I’m just now figuring out what I love. California has always had an inexplicable pull for me. Its changing landscape from the desert to the ocean to the Redwoods is what inspired this photography series “California Wild”. I love the outdoors, no matter what I’m doing and I love meeting new people who care about our environment.

Katherine Schad

Katherine Schad

Katherine Schad, at Scotch Broom
Katherine is an artist living in the beautiful Sierra Foothills of Grass Valley, Ca.She is a self-taught artist passionate about creating and learning new mediums. After having her children in 2001 and 2003 she longed to find a creative outlet. She took a workshop on silk painting- she was hooked. Katherine cares about the sustainable farming movement and has created many paintings celebrating farms and their equipment. Her “Red Tractor” is on display. Katherine enjoys painting pets, people, farms, landscapes, florals and contemporary abstracts. Her favorite mediums are acrylic, ink, silk and colored pencil. You can see more of her works at: www.schadstudio.com or on Facebook at Schad Studio. Please contact Katherine by email at kath@farmart.net to book lessons, art coaching/therapy, join her mailing list, commission a work , purchase art, book a show or simply to talk art.

Reese Sutfin

Reese Sutfin

Reese Sutfin, at Matteos Public
Reese is a Northern California native whose wildlife series is directed at the beauty of the wild and raising awareness of our local species. His subjects are chosen through personal encounters and experiences. The artwork showing consists of close ups of local species, in fine detail, acrylic on canvas. For more info visit reesesutfin.com

Jane Theobald

Jane Theobald

Jane Theobald, at Alpha Building Festival Headquarters
In my mind, trees symbolise all the beauty and complexity of life. A symbol of stability in a changing world; roots for security and branches for hope. As this face emerged out of the decayed oak with my carving, so too did the intricate scars and patterns and colours that were created by the life forms that grew within the dying tree.

 

Loreen Thomas

Loreen Thomas

Loreen Thomas, at Mekka Cafe
I have been drawing and painting for most of my life.  Art is as important to me as breathing.  My artwork is focused on documenting the beauty of the Sierra Nevada Mountains before it is all gone.  Climate change should concern us all. I have lived in Nevada County for nearly 20 years and have seen changes brought to the area by development and population growth as well as the resultant pollution and damage to our environment.   I travel the hiking trails and back roads of the northern mountains with my sketchbook, paints and camera searching for those special places that touch me.  My goal is to draw the viewer into my landscapes to see the vulnerable beauty of the region through my eyes.

Jillian Van Ness

Jillian Van Ness

Jillian VanNess, at Alpha Building Festival Headquarters
While I am primarily a paper and book artist, I also do Eco-Art in the form of installations from recycled and found objects.  My large, hand bound, coptic stitch book that is displayed on a pedestal, prompts viewers to put on a pair of white, cotton gloves to handle and then sign “Earth’s Guestbook.” The piece seeks to put our role and relationship to the natural and spiritual world in perspective; to provide film festival participants the opportunity to speak “directly” to the Earth with gratitude, concern and/or stories, as well as to highlight the irony of handling a book made from and about earth with more care than we handle the earth itself.

Robert Wier

Robert Wier

Robert Wier, at The Fix Restaurant
Emerge is fabricated from a piece of a boulder which I purchased from “Yuba Blue Boulders”, and as you may know, Yuba Blue Boulders is the only decorative rock quarry on the Yuba River. I polished 3 sides of the stone and left the back the natural rough boulder crust. The base is being made from jagged cut pieces steel and found objects. The stone appears to be a dark jadeite; the steel base will also be finished dark with some polished brass elements shining through. Emerge represents the chaos and destruction of modern humans, (steel elements that form the base), emerging into this beautiful stone that is a conjunction of modern human technology (polished portion of the stone, etc) and natural beauty of the raw boulder merged into a beautiful harmony. To me it represents hope that we humans can somehow pull through this time in history, and not destroy ourselves and this Earth, and Emerge into a peaceful and sustainable species – true human beings.